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Summer

Summer Tourism is travel for recreational, leisure or business purposes specifically on sea and beaches. These tourists are beach bums. They like the sea breeze and salt water. They want a clear blue vision of the sea. Summer tourism is one of the earliest modern forms of tourism and a staple of the tourism industry. This kind of tourism at coastal resorts is often considered to result from an inevitable attraction to the beach an sea, but the relationship is one in which tourism and leisure are an inherent part of the formation of the desirability of beaches. As a resort-styled destination, the beach is almost synonymous with the makings of modern tourism. This is partly because the beach as a desirable pleasure space did not become notable until the 19th century.

Winter

Winter Tourism defined as the coldest season of the year, between autumn and spring, astronomically from the December solstice to the March equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere. Winter tourism has become a popular global leisure activity. Winter tourism can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country’s balance of payments. Today, winter tourism is a major source of income for many countries, and affects the economy of both the source and host countries, in some cases being of vital importance.

Nature

Nature tourism is a form of tourism involving visiting fragile, pristine, and relatively undisturbed natural areas, intended as a low-impact and often small scale alternative to standard commercial mass tourism. It means responsible travel to natural areas conserving the environment and improving the well-being of the local people. Its purpose may be to educate the traveler, to provide funds for ecological conservation, to directly benefit the economic development and political empowerment of local communities, or to foster respect for different cultures and for human rights

It is tourism based on the natural attractions of an area. Examples include birdwatching, photography, stargazing, camping, hiking, hunting, fishing, and visiting parks. These experiential tourists are interested in a diversity of natural and cultural resources. They want what is real, and they want to be immersed in a rich natural, cultural, or historical experience.

From the standpoint of conservation, nature-based tourism provides incentives for local communities and landowners to conserve wildlife habitats upon which the industry depends – it promotes conservation by placing an increased value on remaining natural areas. As nature tourism becomes more important to the local economy, communities have additional incentive to conserve their remaining natural areas for wildlife and wildlife enthusiasts.

Culture

Cultural Tourism is the subset of tourism concerned with a traveler’s engagement with a country or region’s culture, specifically the lifestyle of the people in those geographical areas, the history of those people, their art, architecture, religion(s), and other elements that helped shape their way of life.

Cultural tourism includes tourism in urban areas, particularly historic or large cities and their cultural facilities such as museums and theatres. It can also include tourism in rural areas showcasing the traditions of indigenous cultural communities (i.e. festivals, rituals), and their values and lifestyle, as well as niches like industrial tourism and creative tourism.

One type of cultural tourism destination is living cultural areas. Visiting any culture other than one’s own such as traveling to a foreign country. Other destinations include historical sites, modern urban districts, “ethnic pockets” of town, fairs/festivals, theme parks, and natural ecosystems. It has been shown that cultural attractions and events are particularly strong magnets for tourism. The term cultural tourism is used for journeys that include visits to cultural resources, regardless of whether it is tangible or intangible cultural resources, and regardless of the primary motivation. In order to understand properly the concept of cultural tourism, it is necessary to know the definitions of a number terms such as, for example, culture, tourism, cultural economy, cultural and tourism potentials, cultural and tourist offer, and others.

Recreation

Recreation tourism is defined as a specific travel outside of the usual environment for either passive or active involvement in competitive sport where sport is the prime motivational reason for travel and the touristic or leisure element may act to reinforce the overall experience. Another definition worth noting explains sport tourism as a combination of sports activities and travel.

Recreation is an activity of leisure, leisure being discretionary time. The “need to do something for recreation” is an essential element of human biology and psychology. Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment, amusement, or pleasure and are considered to be “fun”.

Recreation is an essential part of human life and finds many different forms which are shaped naturally by individual interests but also by the surrounding social construction. Recreational activities can be communal or solitary, active or passive, outdoors or indoors, healthy or useful for society.

Religious

Religious tourism, also commonly referred to as faith tourism, is a type of tourism, where people travel individually or in groups for pilgrimage, missionary, or leisure (fellowship) purposes.

Religious tourism comprises many facets of the travel industry including:

  • Pilgrimages
  • Marian shrines visits
  • Missionary travel
  • Leisure (fellowship) vacations
  • Faith-based cruising
  • Crusades, conventions and rallies
  • Retreats
  • Monastery visits and guest-stays
  • Faith-based camps
  • Religious tourist attractions